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(Created page with '* '''Name:''' Phil Knirsch * '''Talk title:''' Past, Present and Future of Power Management in Fedora * '''Abstract:''' In recent years, power management in general and reduction...')
 
 
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* '''Talk title:''' Past, Present and Future of Power Management in Fedora
 
* '''Talk title:''' Past, Present and Future of Power Management in Fedora
 
* '''Abstract:''' In recent years, power management in general and reduction of power consumption in particular on modern systems has become more and more important, especially now with the economic crisis. In this talk we first want to look back a bit in time and show what happened in Fedora over the last years that improved power management and consumption. Following that we will present what is currently available in Fedora 11. Especially in regard to system tuning which is done already automatically by the kernel and userland applications and system tuning which you can do manually yourself to squeeze the last few watts out of your system and/or laptop. After that we'll take a look at what the future will or might bring and close it with an open discussion about what you think would be something you'd like to see happening in Fedora.  
 
* '''Abstract:''' In recent years, power management in general and reduction of power consumption in particular on modern systems has become more and more important, especially now with the economic crisis. In this talk we first want to look back a bit in time and show what happened in Fedora over the last years that improved power management and consumption. Following that we will present what is currently available in Fedora 11. Especially in regard to system tuning which is done already automatically by the kernel and userland applications and system tuning which you can do manually yourself to squeeze the last few watts out of your system and/or laptop. After that we'll take a look at what the future will or might bring and close it with an open discussion about what you think would be something you'd like to see happening in Fedora.  
* '''Bio:''' Phil Knirsch is a Software Engineer at Red Hat since 2000 in Germany. During his 9 years his responsibilities included maintenance and development of various components in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora and he was involved in several engineering projects. He was one of the responsible engineers for the first Red Hat Linux version on IBM System Z and in charge of the technical exchange between IBM and Red Hat in Germany for System Z. In the last 2 years he also took up the lead of the engineering team in Germany. Recently he stepped up to lead an effort to improve power consumption for Fedora and the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.
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* '''Bio:''' Phil Knirsch has been a Software Engineer at Red Hat since 2000, located in Germany. His responsibilities have included maintenance and development of various components in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, and he was involved in several engineering projects. He was one of the responsible engineers for the first Red Hat Linux version on IBM System Z and in charge of the technical exchange between IBM and Red Hat in Germany for System Z. In the last 2 years he also took up the lead of the engineering team in Germany. Recently he stepped up to lead an effort to improve power consumption for Fedora and the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

Latest revision as of 08:50, 30 May 2009

  • Name: Phil Knirsch
  • Talk title: Past, Present and Future of Power Management in Fedora
  • Abstract: In recent years, power management in general and reduction of power consumption in particular on modern systems has become more and more important, especially now with the economic crisis. In this talk we first want to look back a bit in time and show what happened in Fedora over the last years that improved power management and consumption. Following that we will present what is currently available in Fedora 11. Especially in regard to system tuning which is done already automatically by the kernel and userland applications and system tuning which you can do manually yourself to squeeze the last few watts out of your system and/or laptop. After that we'll take a look at what the future will or might bring and close it with an open discussion about what you think would be something you'd like to see happening in Fedora.
  • Bio: Phil Knirsch has been a Software Engineer at Red Hat since 2000, located in Germany. His responsibilities have included maintenance and development of various components in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, and he was involved in several engineering projects. He was one of the responsible engineers for the first Red Hat Linux version on IBM System Z and in charge of the technical exchange between IBM and Red Hat in Germany for System Z. In the last 2 years he also took up the lead of the engineering team in Germany. Recently he stepped up to lead an effort to improve power consumption for Fedora and the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.