From Fedora Project Wiki

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End users sometimes want to install software that is not provided by Fedora.  This policy lays out the extent to which Fedora Products can make it easier for end users to do that.
 
End users sometimes want to install software that is not provided by Fedora.  This policy lays out the extent to which Fedora Products can make it easier for end users to do that.
  
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== Copr Repositories ==
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Fedora allows contributors to build rpms and host the output in some repositories on our servers.  Packages in these repositories are not held to the same standards as packages in the
  
 
1) COPRs can provide RPMS with .repo files in them because Red Hat is the provider and assumes liability, but those cannot be included in the main Fedora repos per FESCo decree.
 
1) COPRs can provide RPMS with .repo files in them because Red Hat is the provider and assumes liability, but those cannot be included in the main Fedora repos per FESCo decree.
  
 
2) COPR repos may be searched for applications to install as long as the user is explicitly asked to enable the copr before installing packages from them.
 
2) COPR repos may be searched for applications to install as long as the user is explicitly asked to enable the copr before installing packages from them.
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== Other Repositories with only free (libre) software ==
  
 
3) General 3rd party repositories cannot be searched or enabled due to liability concerns.
 
3) General 3rd party repositories cannot be searched or enabled due to liability concerns.
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(NOTE: "searched" in 2 and 3 was intended to cover searching by software. Clearly users can manually search for anything.)
 
(NOTE: "searched" in 2 and 3 was intended to cover searching by software. Clearly users can manually search for anything.)
  
4) FESCo is okay with pointing to specific free software repositories in the same way as COPR repos if they are approved by FESCo and Fedora Legal. They are not limited in the criteria that they can choose to apply.
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4) FESCo is okay with pointing to specific free software repositories in the same way as COPR repos if they are approved by FESCo and Fedora Legal. They are not limited in the criteria that they can choose to apply.
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== Non-free (libre) software ==
  
5) For non-free sofware repositories, FESCo is not changing exisiting policy. Non-free software repositories are not allowed. Permission to make these discoverable via searching software would require a change in policy from the Fedora Board.
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Repositories that contain non-free software are not allowed in any form, even the indirect method of If a product should want to make these discoverable via searching software would require a change in policy from the Fedora Board.
  
 
[[Category:FESCo_policy]]
 
[[Category:FESCo_policy]]

Revision as of 23:07, 11 December 2013

End users sometimes want to install software that is not provided by Fedora. This policy lays out the extent to which Fedora Products can make it easier for end users to do that.

Copr Repositories

Fedora allows contributors to build rpms and host the output in some repositories on our servers. Packages in these repositories are not held to the same standards as packages in the

1) COPRs can provide RPMS with .repo files in them because Red Hat is the provider and assumes liability, but those cannot be included in the main Fedora repos per FESCo decree.

2) COPR repos may be searched for applications to install as long as the user is explicitly asked to enable the copr before installing packages from them.

Other Repositories with only free (libre) software

3) General 3rd party repositories cannot be searched or enabled due to liability concerns.

(NOTE: "searched" in 2 and 3 was intended to cover searching by software. Clearly users can manually search for anything.)

4) FESCo is okay with pointing to specific free software repositories in the same way as COPR repos if they are approved by FESCo and Fedora Legal. They are not limited in the criteria that they can choose to apply.

Non-free (libre) software

Repositories that contain non-free software are not allowed in any form, even the indirect method of If a product should want to make these discoverable via searching software would require a change in policy from the Fedora Board.