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Associated release criterion
This test case is associated with the Fedora_34_Final_Release_Criteria#user-switching release criterion. If you are doing release validation testing, a failure of this test case may be a breach of that release criterion. If so, please file a bug and nominate it as blocking the appropriate milestone, using the blocker bug nomination page.


Description

This test case tests whether user switching works correctly, i.e. it is possible, in case one user is logged in a system session, another user (or users) can log onto the system and use their own session in parallel with the first user without affecting the original session in any way.

User switching in this context does not represent switching between a desktop session and a virtual console, nor it represents using su or sudo commands to acquire different user identities on a terminal session. Also note, that this test case does not cover switching different between different desktop environments.

Setup

  1. Create a default installation of the Fedora release and Edition (Workstation, KDE) you wish to test.
  2. Create two user accounts.
  3. Clean boot the system.

How to test

Scenario 1

  1. Log in with the first user account.
  2. Check if the correct user has been logged in.
  3. Open one or more applications (optionally open or create some content in them).
  4. Use the system menu to switch users (switch users usually is located along reboot and shutdown menu items)
  5. Log in with the second user account.
  6. Open one or more applications.
  7. Switch to the first user again.
  8. Check that all applications are still running as they were before.
  9. Switch between the users several times.
  10. Log out of the current session.
  11. Try to reboot the system.
  12. Check that a warning dialog appears, informing you that the other user is still logged in and his session data might be lost.
  13. Confirm the reboot.

Scenario 2

  1. Log in with the first user account.
  2. Check if the correct user has been logged in.
  3. Open one or more applications (optionally open or create some content in them).
  4. Identify all possible options to switch the users, e.g. menu item, locked screen, or login screen.
  5. Use all those identified options to switch to a second user account (open some applications there as well) and back to the first user account.
  6. Check that all applications are still running as they were before, after each switch, in both accounts.
  7. Close all sessions.

Scenario 3

  1. Log in with the first user account.
  2. Check if the correct user has been logged in.
  3. Open one or more applications (optionally open or create some content in them).
  4. Switch to the second user.
  5. Do some activity in your session and log out.
  6. Log in again as the same (second) user.
  7. Repeat this process several times (steps 5 to 6).
  8. Switch to the first user again.
  9. Check that all applications are still running as they were before.
  10. Close all sessions.

Scenario 4 (optional)

  1. Try switching more than two users.

Scenario 5 (optional)

  1. If you performed the standard scenarios with users having a login password, try running some of those scenarios with passwordless users (having an empty password, not expired, not locked).
    • At the very minimum you can create passwordless users in certain editions of the Anaconda installer (KDE Live, Everything netinst, etc), or by using the command line on the installed system:
      sudo useradd username
      sudo passwd -d username
  2. And the other way around - if you initially used passwordless users, try running the same steps using users with login passwords.

Expected Results

  1. When starting a new session through user switching, the particular user must be able to log in and his desktop session must start and function fully.
  2. When returning to a previous session, the particular user must be able to log back and the session's previous state must be restored, i.e. all applications are still running as they were before the switch.
  3. When trying to reboot or power-off a system with logged-in users, a warning message about possible consequences must appear and needs to be confirmed before rebooting or powering off.
  4. Problems with logging in and out, as well as with rebooting or powering off the system, are out of scope of this test, but they would automatically fail the QA:Testcase_desktop_login test case.